HIV and STD Basics

HIV continues to infect 50,000 people in our country each year despite the absence of the epidemic from the headlines.

And there are certain groups being infected in the United States at disproportionate rates, rates that we would expect to see in hard-hit developing countries.

STD/HIV Review: Workshop for Educators Who Work With Youth

by the California Department of Public Health, STD Control Branch

This is a comprehensive review of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) including HIV for non-clinical audiences, prioritizing those working with youth. This module provides an overview of common STDs, the relationship between HIV and STDs, and the role of testing and screening to reduce the spread of STDs. Participants will increase knowledge about the unique factors that put adolescents at greater risk for STDs and be able to identify three key messages for youth to reduce the impact of STDs on adolescents. This module was last revised in March, 2019.

HIV Today

Worldwide, almost 40 million people are infected with HIV.
Of these, 17 million do not know they are infected.
22 million do not have access to HIV treatment, including 1.8 million children.

Learn the basics of transmission, progression and treatment.

Social Determinants of Health and HIV

The successful engagement of those communities most impacted by HIV requires a conscious effort to address health disparities and inequities. This training examines the impact that social determinants of health have on the ability of vulnerable communities to access and engage in services.

New Online Courses—Motivational Interviewing & Unconscious Bias

Designed to support DIS work, these online courses are aimed at improving communication with clients and creating more impactful relationships.

Stigma and discrimination are among the foremost barriers to HIV prevention, treatment, care and support. Specifically, research has shown that stigma and discrimination undermine HIV prevention efforts by making people afraid to seek information and services. It inhibits willingness to adopt safer behaviors lest these actions raise suspicion about HIV status, discourages people living with HIV from disclosing their status to family members and sexual partners and undermines their ability and willingness to access and adhere to treatment.

Despite the many challenges of living with HIV, many people have a resilience that allows them to continue to survive and thrive.

“Among gay and bisexual men, black African American men, especially those who are younger, are the group most disproportionately affected by HIV. If current diagnosis rates continue, about 1 in 2 African American gay and bisexual men will be diagnosed with HIV in their lifetime—in comparison to 1 in 4 Hispanic/Latino gay and bisexual men, 1 in 11 white gay and bisexual men, and 1 in 6 gay and bisexual men overall. But these rates are not inevitable. We have more tools to prevent HIV than ever before.”

Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

HIV Today

This interactive and self-paced 60 minute course is designed for two audiences: the general public and a variety of providers who may be new to providing services to those at risk for and infected with HIV. It provides basic information about HIV and AIDS and is designed to provide a brief overview of topics such as transmission, disease progression, risk reduction, prevention and health disparities.

By the end of the course, providers will be familiar with basic information about HIV/AIDS and will have access to resources necessary to gain more information and support.

Social Determinants of Health and HIV

An understanding of social determinants is essential to the implementation of effective HIV treatment or prevention interventions. This engaging and informative one-hour online course, based on our popular two-day instructor-led training, provides an introduction to social determinants and HIV.

This course includes an overview of social determinants, their relevance to health disparities, and their particular importance in understanding HIV in the US today.

View this short video introduction to our Social Determinants of Health course. You can learn more by taking the course, or viewing our related videos in the adjoining tabs.

Culture is the blended patterns of human behavior that include “language, thoughts, communications, actions, customs, beliefs, values, and institutions of racial, ethnic, religious, or social groups.” Cultural competence is “a set of congruent behaviors, attitudes, and policies that come together in a system, agency, or among professionals that enables effective work in cross-cultural situations.” “Competence” in the term cultural competence implies that an individual or organization has the capacity to function effectively “within the context of the cultural beliefs, behaviors, and needs presented by consumers and their communities.”

– Center for Disease Control and Prevention

“About 1.2 million persons in the United States are infected with HIV. 80% have been diagnosed…only half of those are engaged in care.”
– Centers for Disease Control

Six fundamental sexual health principles guide clients toward a greater understanding of their current relationship with HIV. Linking sexual health principles within HIV services is a collaborative sexual health conversation that defines and supports each person’s personal vision of sexual health.

HIV-positive individuals experience elevated rates of incarceration and elevated rates of HIV are found in incarcerated populations. Dr. Harawa shares information from research by her and others on the unique challenges experienced by incarcerated and post-incarcerated HIV-positive people, in order to assist providers in addressing these challenges.

Despite being engaged in care, many HIV positive women still struggle with stigma, non-disclosure, isolation, depression, addiction and other barriers to health and well-being. Recognizing and addressing the high rates of trauma in this population holds the promise to reframe care and to help HIV-positive women realize their inherent health and power.

Taking a sexual history is not a talent that some people happen to be born with. Just like listening to a heart or looking in an ear, the sexual history requires skills that need to be practiced again and again.

Linda Creegan talks about these skills and demonstrates sexual history taking using the five P‘s: Past STDs, Pregnancy history and plans, Partners, Sexual Practices and Prevention of STDs and HIV.

Culture is the blended patterns of human behavior that include “language, thoughts, communications, actions, customs, beliefs, values, and institutions of racial, ethnic, religious, or social groups.” Cultural competence is “a set of congruent behaviors, attitudes, and policies that come together in a system, agency, or among professionals that enables effective work in cross-cultural situations.” “Competence” in the term cultural competence implies that an individual or organization has the capacity to function effectively “within the context of the cultural beliefs, behaviors, and needs presented by consumers and their communities.”

– Center for Disease Control and Prevention

Six fundamental sexual health principles guide clients toward a greater understanding of their current relationship with HIV. Linking sexual health principles within HIV services is a collaborative sexual health conversation that defines and supports each person’s personal vision of sexual health.

STD/HIV Review: Workshop for Educators Who Work With Youth

This is a comprehensive review of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) including HIV for non-clinical audiences, prioritizing those working with youth. This module provides an overview of common STDs, the relationship between HIV and STDs, and the role of testing and screening to reduce the spread of STDs. Participants will increase knowledge about the unique factors that put adolescents at greater risk for STDs and be able to identify three key messages for youth to reduce the impact of STDs on adolescents. This module was last revised in March, 2019.

Latest Online Trainings to Support Your Work

Motivational Interviewing - History and Spirit

In this introductory module, we provide an overview of the rationale and evidence for using motivational interviewing to facilitate change with clients. 

Motivational Interviewing - Principles in Action

In this introductory module, we provide an overview of the rationale and evidence for using motivational interviewing to facilitate change with clients.  

Moving from Bias to Engagement Using Cultural Humility

Developing cultural humility involves understanding the impact that unconscious bias and medical mistrust and distrust have on client engagement.

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